Archives for posts with tag: Plunton House

The early part of spring has been house-painting time. It’s taken a while and a lot of time up a high ladder, but we’ve finished the front with two coats.

painted.house.03 (Large)The garden side and the back are next. I’m not sure how we’re going to tackle the garage side. Maybe even call in the professionals.

Nevertheless, the front looks great and the contrast with the sandstone is lovely.

Just before Christmas we went to a party at our neighbours’ house over at Lennox Plunton. The farmer there, Benjy, is the son of Mrs Sproat, who lived in this house. In fact, Lennox Plunton, Plunton House and much of the land around here has been farmed by the Sproats since the 18th century.

While we were there, we were given an envelope of pictures of the house, most of them from the late 1980s and early 1990s and one much older than that. It’s lovely to see the subtle changes to the house and the beautiful garden as it has developed over time.

Plunton House in sepia, from the west on Lennox Plunton land. The buildings to the right are the piggery and steading which have since been converted into homes.

Plunton House in sepia, from the West on Lennox Plunton land. The buildings to the right are the piggery and steading which have since been converted into homes.

Here’s one of the more recent ones but before the double-glazed sun room was added.

Original porch and lovely flowers. I also suspect this was the last time the house was freshly painted!

Original porch and lovely flowers. I also suspect this was the last time the house was freshly painted!

There are a couple of Plunton dealing with adverse weather, including one of the “pond”.

Reflections on the pond

Reflections on the pond

Snowy drive and rhododendrons.

Snowy drive and rhododendrons.

And I love how this one captures the amazing winter skies we get here. I think it must have been taken from the study window.

Plunton skies

Plunton skies

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Our neighbour, Janet, had told us on Hogmanay that our garden and the copse in the field are strewn with spring bulbs – snowdrops and bluebells in particular. Although we first saw Plunton House last spring, it was shortly after the worst snowfall in the area’s recent history and few bulbs had survived the onslaught of spring snowdrifts.

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So, on Saturday we got our first glimpse of this naturalised bounty. Where there was a pond a few weeks ago there are now masses of tiny white flowers growing on the slope. The more we looked, the more clumps we found – on the worn bare ground under the swing we tied to the old apple tree, on the grass verge, clustered for shelter around the base of rhododendrons. We’re trying to keep a note of where clumps look choked or threatened (like under the swing!) so we can move them to safer locations once they have finished flowering. We’ve also discovered early daffodils waiting their turn to blossom in the sun. Hard to believe on a cold and frosty day like today but Spring really is around the corner.

So the plan is that we get the keys to Plunton next Friday, 2nd August. At least that’s when we have to leave our current home but life doesn’t always pan out like that. Image